Int J Biol Sci 2018; 14(11):1466-1471. doi:10.7150/ijbs.26987

Research Paper

Demonstrating the Potential of Using Transcutaneous Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Tensions to Assess the Risk of Pressure Injuries

Mei Xue1#, Dandan Wang2#, Zhaozhi Zhang3, Zhixin Cao1✉, Zujin Luo1, Yingying Zheng1, Jingjing Lu1, Qi Zhao2, Xiaohua Douglas Zhang2✉

1. Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University; Beijing Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Beijing Engineering Research Center of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Engineering Research Center of Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing 100043, China
2. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa 999078, Macau
3. Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
#: These authors contributed equally.

Abstract

Pressure injuries have a high incidence in elderly and critically ill patients, and can endanger lives in severe cases. The key to reducing the incidence of pressure injuries is to find an objective, noninvasive, automatic and consistent scientific method for assessing pressure injuries. To serve this need, we conducted a clinical study to investigate the potential of using transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (TcPCO2) for assessing pressure injuries. From the results of the study we found that first, the values of TcPO2 and TcPCO2 are sensitive to the change of pressure imposed on the measured region and to the risk status of a pressure injury when a pressure is imposed. Second, the magnitude of change in TcPO2 and TcPCO2 is higher in patients with a high risk of a pressure injury compared with those who have a low risk. Third, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 are both significantly correlated with the Braden score, the widely used score for assessing the risk of a pressure injury. Therefore, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 have a potential to be an effective and convenient scientific tool for assessing the risk of pressure injuries.

Keywords: Pressure injury, transcutaneous oxygen tension, transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension, Braden score

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How to cite this article:
Xue M, Wang D, Zhang Z, Cao Z, Luo Z, Zheng Y, Lu J, Zhao Q, Zhang XD. Demonstrating the Potential of Using Transcutaneous Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Tensions to Assess the Risk of Pressure Injuries. Int J Biol Sci 2018; 14(11):1466-1471. doi:10.7150/ijbs.26987. Available from http://www.ijbs.com/v14p1466.htm