Int J Biol Sci 2021; 17(2):487-497. doi:10.7150/ijbs.52452

Research Paper

The association of Metabolic Syndrome and its Components with the Incidence and Survival of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Fei Han1#, Guanghai Wu2#, Shuai Zhang2, Judong Zhang2, Yongjie Zhao2✉, Jing Xu2✉

1. NHC Key Laboratory of Hormones and Development, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases, Chu Hsien-I Memorial Hospital & Tianjin Institute of Endocrinology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300134, China.
2. Department of General Surgery, Tianjin Union Medical Center, Tianjin 300121, China.
#These authors contributed equally to this work.

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Citation:
Han F, Wu G, Zhang S, Zhang J, Zhao Y, Xu J. The association of Metabolic Syndrome and its Components with the Incidence and Survival of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Int J Biol Sci 2021; 17(2):487-497. doi:10.7150/ijbs.52452. Available from https://www.ijbs.com/v17p0487.htm

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Abstract

Background: This meta-analysis was aimed to quantitatively assess the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with colorectal cancer (CRC).

Methods: PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were systematically searched for eligible studies. A total of 18 studies for CRC incidence and 12 studies for CRC mortality were identified.

Results: MetS was associated with an increased risk of CRC incidence and mortality in male (RR: 1.28, 95 % CI 1.16-1.39, and 1.24, 1.18-1.31, respectively) and correlated with an increased risk of CRC incidence in female (RR: 1.21, 1.13-1.30), but not with CRC mortality in female. MetS increased the risk of cancer-specific mortality (RR: 1.72, 1.03-2.42), but not overall mortality. The risk estimates of CRC incidence changed little depending on age, sex, cancer site, the type of studies, ethnicity, publication year, or definition of MetS. As for CRC mortality, further stratified analyses indicated statistical significance in studies with assessing cancer-specific survival outcome, in male, a cohort design, ethnicity of non-Chinese or with definition of MetS as ≥ 3 metabolic abnormalities. Obesity and hyperglycemia are risk factors of CRC incidence in both male and female. Only dysglycemia is the risk factor for CRC mortality.

Conclusions: MetS is associated with an increased risk of CRC incidence and cancer-specific mortality, but not overall mortality. In addition, MetS may increase the CRC mortality in male rather than in female. However, since most of the studies on CRC mortality were conducted in Chinese, further studies are needed to clarify this connection.

Keywords: metabolic syndrome, colorectal cancer, incidence, survival, meta-analysis