Int J Biol Sci 2022; 18(10):4101-4117. doi:10.7150/ijbs.69331 This issue

Review

Gut microbiome in gastrointestinal cancer: a friend or foe?

Yang Liu1, Yoshifumi Baba2,3, Takatsugu Ishimoto2,4, Xi Gu1, Jun Zhang2,4, Daichi Nomoto2, Kazuo Okadome2, Hideo Baba2,5, Peng Qiu6✉

1. Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, 110004, Liaoning province, China.
2. Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
3. Department of Next-Generation Surgical Therapy Development, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
4. Gastrointestinal Cancer Biology, International Research Center for Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
5. Center for Metabolic Regulation of Healthy Aging, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
6. Department of Anesthesiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, 110004, Liaoning Province, China.

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Citation:
Liu Y, Baba Y, Ishimoto T, Gu X, Zhang J, Nomoto D, Okadome K, Baba H, Qiu P. Gut microbiome in gastrointestinal cancer: a friend or foe?. Int J Biol Sci 2022; 18(10):4101-4117. doi:10.7150/ijbs.69331. Available from https://www.ijbs.com/v18p4101.htm

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Abstract

Graphic abstract

The impact of the gut microbiome on host health is becoming increasingly recognized. To date, there is growing evidence that the complex characteristics of the microbial community play key roles as potential biomarkers and predictors of responses in cancer therapy. Many studies have shown that altered commensal bacteria lead to cancer susceptibility and progression in diverse pathways. In this review, we critically assess the data for gut microbiota related to gastrointestinal cancer, including esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. Importantly, the underlying mechanisms of gut microbiota involved in cancer occurrence, prevention and treatment are elucidated. The purpose of this review is to provide novel insights for applying this understanding to the development of new therapeutic strategies in gastrointestinal cancer by targeting the microbial community.

Keywords: gut microbiota, GI cancer, carcinogenesis, chemotherapy